Monday, February 26, 2018

Improv #4 Update

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Here's a work in progress picture of the fourth Improv Patchwork quilt -


Raspberry Cheesecake quilt in progress

you can kind of tell that my free-form cutting got a bit free-er as the quilt progressed from left to right, cause the left side of that first strip sure is straight! I think I'll unsew that and give it a few deeper curves, and maybe add another strip over there. Have to see how much of the strip set I have left.

So, how was this quilt made? Pretty much like the first set of wavy improv stripes, but cutting curves from a strip set and solid fabric. Check out this super long strip set, 


fuchsia strip set

approximately 54" long, 18" wide. Notice all the stored fabric underneath - all that yardage I sold off hardly made a dent!

And just like before, I cut matching curves from the strip set and the solid fabric,


cutting matching free hand curves for improv patchwork

using the 40" width of the solid, and moving the strip set up and down for each stripe so that the same fabrics didn't land at the same spot every time. After I fix that first section, this will probably be wide enough to call it finished.

By the way, I found this cutting technique especially useful for piecing batting scraps together. See how one edge is ragged and the other a smooth curve?


batting to join

Placing the smooth curve on top of the ragged, then cutting following that smooth edge, 


batting after smooth cut

makes for a well-fitting seam, easily zigzagged together.


joined batting scraps

Ta-da! Batting ready to go, though not for this project. 
So, even if you don't want to try free-hand cut stripes or curves with fabric, just know you can do it with batting!

Happy Quilting!



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10 comments:

  1. Improv and I don't usually go well together, but this looks like fun.

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    1. It was fun! Usually, I like a bit more controlled improv but though this book, I've discovered that improv really runs a wide range of styles.

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  2. You are just getting so good at this curved improv. And of course you remind me I have loads of scrap batting that needs to be put together and used. I just hate taking time to do it, LOL

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    1. Thanks! The curves are really easy if they're gentle, and match up with the next piece. It's actually a good skill to have!

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  3. That looks so pretty. Great strata for the purple too.

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  4. I love this idea but I despise curved piecing. Even Y seams are more attractive to me, lol. Someone will be very happy to receive this quilt.

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    Replies
    1. One could always cut wedges instead of curves. Hmm, I may have to try that idea!

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  5. I like how you got more comfortable with the curves as you worked along. You're doing great!

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    Replies
    1. There certainly is an art to cutting them so they're not too curvy, but curvy enough to have it show.

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Thank you so much for commenting...you just made my day!